^ Baggoley C (2015). "Review of the Australian Government Rebate on Natural Therapies for Private Health Insurance" (PDF). Australian Government – Department of Health. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2015. Lay summary – Gavura, S. Australian review finds no benefit to 17 natural therapies. Science-Based Medicine (19 November 2015).
I like to help people find unique ways to do things that will save time & money — so I write about "outside the box" Household Tips and Life Hacks that most wouldn't think of. I'm super-organized. And I LOVE to clean! I even enjoy doing laundry (but not ironing). I’m also a lifelong dog owner — so I often share my favorite tips for living with dogs inside your home (like smart home design choices and dog-friendly cleaning & decorating ideas). Career-wise, I've been sharing my best ideas with others by blogging full-time since 1998 (the same year that Google started… and before the days of Facebook and YouTube). Prior to that, I worked in Higher Ed over 10 years before switching gears to pursue activities that I'm truly passionate about instead. For example, I've worked at a vet, in a photo lab, and at a zoo — to name a few. I enjoy the outdoors via bicycle, motorcycle, Jeep, or RV. When I’m not cleaning, organizing, decorating, or fixing something… you'll find me at the corner of Good News & Fun Times as publisher of The Fun Times Guide (32 fun & helpful websites).
Used the right way, they can help you feel better with few side effects. For example, you may feel less nauseated from chemotherapy cancer treatment if you breathe in ginger vapors. You may be able to fight certain bacterial or fungal infections, including the dangerous MRSA bacteria, with tea tree oil. In one study, tea tree oil was as effective as a prescription antifungal cream in easing symptoms of a fungal foot infection.
While some advocate the ingestion of essential oils for therapeutic purposes, licensed aromatherapy professionals do not recommend self-prescription due to the highly toxic nature of some essential oils. Some very common oils like eucalyptus are extremely toxic when taken internally. Doses as low as 2 mL have been reported to cause clinically significant symptoms and severe poisoning can occur after ingestion of as little as 4 mL.[37] A few reported cases of toxic reactions like liver damage and seizures have occurred after ingestion of sage, hyssop, thuja and cedar oils.[38] Accidental ingestion may happen when oils are not kept out of reach of children. As with any bioactive substance, an essential oil that may be safe for the general public could still pose hazards for pregnant and lactating women.[citation needed]
Studies have shown that essential oils effectively destroy several fungal, viral and bacterial pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Helicobacter pylori and Candida albicans infections. Because antibiotic resistance is becoming such a major threat in modern health care, using these oils as a form of independent or combination therapy can help to fight bacterial infections in a safer and more natural way.  (4, 5)

Especially if skin sensitivity is a concern, definitely ALWAYS dilute your essential oil with a common neutral carrier oil (also called base oils) before application. Carrier oils are typically cold-pressed oils and do not evaporate like essential oils do, but they can go rancid where essential oils will not. Your choice of carrier oil will depend a bit on preference of smell, texture, and sensitivities to avoid allergic reactions. Popular choices for carrier oils are coconut oil, sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, avocado oil, sunflower oil or grape seed oil.

Topically – this is the most popular way to use it. (and what I do most of the time) Place on your head (around the crown), behind ears, wrists or on the vita flex points. You can dilute the oil with a carrier oil, such as coconut oil (any natural vegetable oil is fine too, such as grape seed, olive, avocado or jojoba) to reduce the strength or smell of the oil if it’s too much.
Whilst this can seem confusing, the best advice for oil selection is to test which scents you like the smell of, because the ones your body needs tend to show themselves as the ones you like! This can change daily depending on your healing needs at the time. On our website, you can read a description of the scent and learn more about the properties of the oils and their therapeutic effects. Check out the ‘Safety Notes’ before you use them and check with your GP if you are pregnant or have more serious conditions such as epilepsy or blood pressure problems.
There is no good medical evidence that aromatherapy can prevent or cure any disease.[5][16] For cancer patients, aromatherapy has been found to lower anxiety and depression symptoms.[17] In 2015, the Australian Government's Department of Health published the results of a review of alternative therapies that sought to determine if any were suitable for being covered by health insurance; aromatherapy was one of 17 therapies evaluated for which no clear evidence of effectiveness was found.[18]
^ Kuriyama, Hiroko; Watanabe, Satoko; Nakaya, Takaaki; Shigemori, Ichiro; Kita, Masakazu; Yoshida, Noriko; Masaki, Daiki; Tadai, Toshiaki; Ozasa, Kotaro; Fukui, Kenji; Imanishi, Jiro (2005). "Immunological and Psychological Benefits of Aromatherapy Massage". Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2 (2): 179–184. doi:10.1093/ecam/neh087. PMC 1142199. PMID 15937558.
Orange essential oil has a sweet, bright aroma reminiscent of a blossoming orchard of orange trees. Start your day with an uplifting burst of liquid sunshine by diffusing Orange as you get ready in the morning. With just a few drops, you can fill any space with a sense of peace, harmony, and creativity. Orange is delightful on its own, or you can combine it with complementary oils such as Grapefruit or Cinnamon.
Boil 2-3 cups of water, pour it into a bowl and add 2-5 drops of oil to the water. Place your nose about 12” away from the bowl, cover your head and bowl with a towel, and slowly inhale the steam. Using either energizing or relaxing essential oils can make this method useful any time of the day or night. If you notice any discomfort or irritation, stop immediately.
Some oils, such as clary sage, geranium and thyme, help to balance out estrogen and progesterone levels in your body, which can improve conditions like infertility and PCOS, as well as PMS and menopause symptoms. A 2017 published in Neuro Endocrinology Letters indicates that geranium and rose have the ability to influence the salivary concentration of estrogen in women. This may be helpful for women who are experiencing menopausal symptoms that are caused by declining levels of estrogen secretion. (2)
A 2014 systematic review conducted at the University of Minnesota evaluated 15 quantitative studies, including 11 randomized controlled trials that examined the effects of essential oils on sleep. Researchers found that a majority of the study findings suggest a positive effect of oils on sleep deprivation and disturbances. Lavender oil was the most frequently studied oil and of all evaluated studies, no adverse events were reported. (20)
DO: Read as much as you can about aromatherapy. It is very easy to get started with aromatherapy, but there are safety issues that you need to be aware of. AromaWeb offers safety tips and information to help you on your way, but you are wise to read even further on the important subject of essential oil safety. Visit the Book Shelf for categorized essential oil book reviews.
According to a review published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, “at least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1,500 combinations.” What gives these oils their skin benefits is their ability to fight against pathogens that are responsible for dermatological infections. Oils can also help to improve inflammatory skin conditions, like dermatitis, eczema and lupus, improve the general appearance of your skin and even aid wound healing. (16)
Hey Hela, I would highly recommend reading this post: https://livesimply.me/2015/03/07/essential-oils-101-22-important-questions-answers/. It’s an interview with the aromatherapist team from Plant Therapy, and provides so much valuable information from what’s a good essential oil to how to use them. I purchase NOW brand on occasion. They are a good brand, in my opinion. Lavender varies in prices depending on the type.
This is one of the most vital things you must know about essential oils: not all essential oils are created equal. In fact, most of them are worthless to your health and often synthetic. Therefore, when buying such oils — whether 5ml, 10ml or 15ml bottles — choose pure ones that are certified USDA organic, 100 percent pure, therapeutic grade and indigenously sourced.

Boil 2-3 cups of water, pour it into a bowl and add 2-5 drops of oil to the water. Place your nose about 12” away from the bowl, cover your head and bowl with a towel, and slowly inhale the steam. Using either energizing or relaxing essential oils can make this method useful any time of the day or night. If you notice any discomfort or irritation, stop immediately.

Boil 2-3 cups of water, pour it into a bowl and add 2-5 drops of oil to the water. Place your nose about 12” away from the bowl, cover your head and bowl with a towel, and slowly inhale the steam. Using either energizing or relaxing essential oils can make this method useful any time of the day or night. If you notice any discomfort or irritation, stop immediately.

Important Disclaimer: The information contained on Cushy Spa is intended for informational and educational purposes only. Any statements made on this website have not been evaluated by the FDA and any information or products discussed are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent any disease or illness. Please consult a healthcare practitioner before making changes to your diet or taking supplements that may interfere with medications.
Hey Karen, There’s so much information on essential oils and much of it comes from MLM companies looking to sell lots of oils (much like Avon). These companies work on a commission basis and encourage reps to push information that’s not always safe or studied. I think much of the information on ingesting oils comes from these companies and sellers. I wouldn’t advise ingesting oils unless under the care of a natural doctor that knows what they are doing. One of the best sources for all-things essential oil safety is this independent site run by a certified aromatherapist: http://www.learningabouteos.com/. Plant Therapy also provides great information on their blog. Hope that helps :).
Before using essential it’s important to educate yourself! Knowing what essential oils work best for various uses, which essential oils should not be used around children or even in the sun, and how to store oil is vital to safe essential oil usage. Plant Therapy provides responsible education for oil use on their site. You can read more about essential oil FAQs here and here. Keeping a non-biased reference book on essential oil basics can prove very handy.
There is no good medical evidence that aromatherapy can prevent or cure any disease.[5][16] For cancer patients, aromatherapy has been found to lower anxiety and depression symptoms.[17] In 2015, the Australian Government's Department of Health published the results of a review of alternative therapies that sought to determine if any were suitable for being covered by health insurance; aromatherapy was one of 17 therapies evaluated for which no clear evidence of effectiveness was found.[18]
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