Evidence for the efficacy of aromatherapy in treating medical conditions is poor, with a particular lack of studies employing rigorous methodology.[19][20] A number of systematic reviews have studied the clinical effectiveness of aromatherapy in respect to pain management in labor,[21] the treatment of post-operative nausea and vomiting,[6] managing challenging behaviors in people who have dementia,[22] and symptom relief in cancer.[23] However, some studies have come to the conclusion that while it does improve the patient's mood, there is no conclusive evidence on how it works with pain management.[24] Studies have been inconclusive because of the fact that no straightforward evidence exists. All of these reviews report a lack of evidence on the effectiveness of aromatherapy.[17]
Aromatherapists, people who specialize in the practice of aromatherapy, utilize blends of supposedly therapeutic essential oils that can be used as topical application, massage, inhalation or water immersion. There is no good medical evidence that aromatherapy can either prevent, treat, or cure any disease.[4] Placebo-controlled trials are difficult to design, as the point of aromatherapy is the smell of the products. There is disputed evidence that it may be effective in combating postoperative nausea and vomiting.[5][6]

When I first started using essential oils for my homemade products, I only owned one oil: lavender. I’ve always been obsessed with the lavender fragrance. Once I learned about the healing properties of lavender for the skin, I decided to add a few drops to my homemade foundation powder. Between the absence of toxins from the store-bought powder and the healing properties of lavender, my acne-prone skin cleared within a few weeks. I was beyond thrilled.
Frankincense has a broad range of uses, from enhancing meditative practice to use in beauty routines. Frankincense has an earthy, uplifting aroma that’s perfect for grounding and spiritual connectedness. Diffuse this oil’s empowering aroma particularly when you are seeking purpose or engaged in prayer or meditation. Frankincense is amazing for your skin and can help you maintain the appearance of radiant youthful skin.
Frankincense has a broad range of uses, from enhancing meditative practice to use in beauty routines. Frankincense has an earthy, uplifting aroma that’s perfect for grounding and spiritual connectedness. Diffuse this oil’s empowering aroma particularly when you are seeking purpose or engaged in prayer or meditation. Frankincense is amazing for your skin and can help you maintain the appearance of radiant youthful skin.
Hey Natalie, I personally don’t like the multiple level marketing tactics of the big companies. I know many of the reps are genuine, but I also think there’s a lot of misinformation and disregard for safety promoted by many of the representatives selling oils for these companies because they are motivated by selling more and more (commissions, higher rank–reaching diamond level, etc. ). I’m not saying this is everyone, but I’ve seen this behavior demonstrated often by the model of selling. Plus, many of their claims are pure marketing gimmick (they have good oils, but their marketing that “their oils are the only pure oils” is nonsense). Because their reps receive a large commission on sales, the oils are far more expensive than they need to be (based on my research). I have nothing against these companies, but the practices I’ve witnessed over the years is enough to keep me away.

There are also quite a few studies that have found essential oils to be helpful for hair growth. One such study, conducted in 2015, evaluated the efficacy of rosemary oil on patients with androgenetic alopecia, or male or female pattern baldness. Patients were randomly assigned to rosemary oil or minoxidil (a medication commonly used for hair loss) for a six-month treatment period. Researchers found that both groups experienced a significant increase in hair count at the six-month endpoint. They also indicated that scalp itching was more frequent in the minoxidil group. (17)


^ Baggoley C (2015). "Review of the Australian Government Rebate on Natural Therapies for Private Health Insurance" (PDF). Australian Government – Department of Health. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2015. Lay summary – Gavura, S. Australian review finds no benefit to 17 natural therapies. Science-Based Medicine (19 November 2015).

The inhaled aroma from these "essential" oils is widely believed to stimulate brain function. Essential oils can also be absorbed through the skin, where they travel through the bloodstream and can promote whole-body healing. A form of alternative medicine, aromatherapy is gaining momentum. It is used for a variety of applications, including pain relief, mood enhancement and increased cognitive function.
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