Young children and the elderly may be more sensitive to essential oils. So you may need to dilute them more. And you should totally avoid some oils, like birch and wintergreen. In even small amounts, those may cause serious problems in kids 6 or younger because they contain a chemical called methyl salicylate. Don’t use essential oils on a baby unless your pediatrician says it’s OK.

Thank you SO much for the great info. I am currently in nursing school but am so interested in learning about more holistic alternatives and have been wanting to experiment with essential oils for quite some time but have always felt overwhelmed with where to begin! So I think I will start with one of the kits from plant therapy (the one that comes with 7 I think) and this might be a silly question, can I use any diffuser with essential oils or does it have to be a certain one? And also, do you have to use a carrier oil with the diffuser or just put the essential oil in ? Thanks in advance for your guidance !
When I first started using essential oils for my homemade products, I only owned one oil: lavender. I’ve always been obsessed with the lavender fragrance. Once I learned about the healing properties of lavender for the skin, I decided to add a few drops to my homemade foundation powder. Between the absence of toxins from the store-bought powder and the healing properties of lavender, my acne-prone skin cleared within a few weeks. I was beyond thrilled.

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Aromatherapy is a pseudoscience based on the usage of aromatic materials, including essential oils, and other aroma compounds, with claims for improving psychological or physical well-being.[1] It is offered as a complementary therapy or as a form of alternative medicine, the first meaning alongside standard treatments,[2] the second instead of conventional, evidence-based treatments.[3]
According to a review published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, “at least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1,500 combinations.” What gives these oils their skin benefits is their ability to fight against pathogens that are responsible for dermatological infections. Oils can also help to improve inflammatory skin conditions, like dermatitis, eczema and lupus, improve the general appearance of your skin and even aid wound healing. (16)

No single page, article or guide can provide all the details to using essential oils properly. After reading these tips, I would like to invite you to refer to AromaWeb's Guides & Articles area to read 130 articles that will help get you started on your essential oil journey. All of the articles are free, and there are no pop-ups or subscription forms to fill out.

The use of essential oils for therapeutic, spiritual, hygienic and ritualistic purposes goes back to ancient civilizations including the Chinese, Indians, Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans who used them in cosmetics, perfumes and drugs.[7] Oils were used for aesthetic pleasure and in the beauty industry. It was a luxury item and a means of payment. It was believed the essential oils increased the shelf life of wine and improved the taste of food.
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