Especially if skin sensitivity is a concern, definitely ALWAYS dilute your essential oil with a common neutral carrier oil (also called base oils) before application. Carrier oils are typically cold-pressed oils and do not evaporate like essential oils do, but they can go rancid where essential oils will not. Your choice of carrier oil will depend a bit on preference of smell, texture, and sensitivities to avoid allergic reactions. Popular choices for carrier oils are coconut oil, sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, avocado oil, sunflower oil or grape seed oil.
The information provided on this Web site, through its social media networks and in supporting materials and communications is intended for basic, general informational purposes only. It is not intended as medical advice and it does not include all possible precautions, side effects, or interactions that may occur. Neither AromaWeb, LLC nor its founder take responsibility for how you use the information provided. Statements contained on AromaWeb have not been evaluated by the FDA. You should conduct thorough research via multiple sources and consult directly with a qualified doctor before using any essential oil or product. Information on AromaWeb must not be relied upon for medical, legal, financial or other decisions.
^ Baggoley C (2015). "Review of the Australian Government Rebate on Natural Therapies for Private Health Insurance" (PDF). Australian Government – Department of Health. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2015. Lay summary – Gavura, S. Australian review finds no benefit to 17 natural therapies. Science-Based Medicine (19 November 2015).
What is an essential oil? Typically created through the process of distillation — which separates the oil and water-based compounds of a plant by steaming — they are highly concentrated oils that have a strong aroma. In fact, sometimes they are called volatile aromatic oils because of their high concentration of the aromatic compounds. (1) They also are simply called aromatherapy oils.
Hey Hela, I would highly recommend reading this post: https://livesimply.me/2015/03/07/essential-oils-101-22-important-questions-answers/. It’s an interview with the aromatherapist team from Plant Therapy, and provides so much valuable information from what’s a good essential oil to how to use them. I purchase NOW brand on occasion. They are a good brand, in my opinion. Lavender varies in prices depending on the type.
Another useful essential oil for digestion is peppermint. Research shows that peppermint oil works to provide rapid relief of IBS symptoms. In a 4-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 72 patients with IBS received either peppermint oil or placebo. The peppermint group experienced a 40 percent reduction in total IBS symptoms after 4 weeks, which was superior to the 24 percent decrease of symptoms reported by the patients in the placebo group. After just 24 hours of using peppermint oil, the treatment group experienced a decrease in symptoms of 19.6 percent. (8)
The information provided on this Web site, through its social media networks and in supporting materials and communications is intended for basic, general informational purposes only. It is not intended as medical advice and it does not include all possible precautions, side effects, or interactions that may occur. Neither AromaWeb, LLC nor its founder take responsibility for how you use the information provided. Statements contained on AromaWeb have not been evaluated by the FDA. You should conduct thorough research via multiple sources and consult directly with a qualified doctor before using any essential oil or product. Information on AromaWeb must not be relied upon for medical, legal, financial or other decisions.
Peppermint is a very recognizable scent, after all they make gum that smells like peppermint. But Peppermint is so much more than just a nostalgic, fresh aroma. This oil can be diffused to create a stimulating, focused atmosphere for daily tasks. You can also apply it topically to create a cool, tingling sensation on the skin, which can be very soothing after hard physical activity. Peppermint can help relieve headaches, curb appetite, settle an upset tummy and is great for an afternoon pick me up.
So ya’ll are saying that we are not supposed to ingest the EO’s in any form? I am just getting into using the oils and have ingested pepperment oil but nothing else yet. After reading the statements that I have read here, I am no longer sure that is a safe idea. When oils are use on the skin for massage, rub, lotion, makeup and othe applications, doesn’t it enter the body through our pores and end up in the blood stream? Just curious and questioning because I am so new to oils and trying to learn as I try to sift through all of the information that is our there in cyber land. Thank you for any help that you can give me.

All information, commentary, tips and other postings are for information and entertainment purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the US Food & Drug Administration or Health Canada. They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Use of this website constitutes acceptance of Easy-Aromatherapy-Recipes.com's disclaimer, privacy policy and advertising policy.
According to a review published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, “at least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1,500 combinations.” What gives these oils their skin benefits is their ability to fight against pathogens that are responsible for dermatological infections. Oils can also help to improve inflammatory skin conditions, like dermatitis, eczema and lupus, improve the general appearance of your skin and even aid wound healing. (16)
Because a little bit of oil goes a very long way, a starter set of oils lasts months (if not longer) in our house. It’s a good thing the shelf life of oils is around 1-2 years. One of my favorite sets that includes seven basic oils and seven synergy blends is the “14 Essential Oil Set” from Plant Therapy.  This set contains the majority of oils needed to make most of my homemade products, along with therapeutic synergies (blends of individual oils).
Essential oils extracted from plants (literally taking the “essence” of the scent and flavor of the plant or herb) have been used for medicinal and wellness purposes for centuries. Sometimes the benefits come from rubbing the oils into the skin but they can also be added to warm baths or misters to inhale for aromatherapy benefits. Depending on the oil, they can be used to ease headaches or muscle pain, help with emotional issues like anxiety and stress. Some oils (such as peppermint, lavender, and lemon) have more than one purpose and can be blended, so we checked out kits that cover the basics. When choosing, make sure these collections include any personal favorites. We also looked for oils that are naturally derived rather than having gone through a chemical process. This ensures they are purer and less diluted, with authentic aromas to create a pleasing scent to ease your aches and pains — or, just to make bath time into a spa ritual.  

Known for its gentle, woodsy aroma, Copaiba has high levels of beta-caryophyllene and a uniquely sweet aromatic profile, which helps create a relaxing atmosphere when it is diffused or applied topically. Copaiba is a great addition to your daily routine and skin care. Add it to a neutral moisturizer to utilize its natural fragrance and moisturizing properties. It can also be applied following activity for a comforting cooldown. Aids with sore muscles and helps reduce inflammation.

There is no good medical evidence that aromatherapy can prevent or cure any disease.[5][16] For cancer patients, aromatherapy has been found to lower anxiety and depression symptoms.[17] In 2015, the Australian Government's Department of Health published the results of a review of alternative therapies that sought to determine if any were suitable for being covered by health insurance; aromatherapy was one of 17 therapies evaluated for which no clear evidence of effectiveness was found.[18]
×