Whilst many people think that the ‘massage’ element is the main event when they go for an Aromatherapy treatment, it is actually more about choosing the best essential oils and allowing them to work their magic. It is the power of the essential oils that is key: the massage therapy simply creates an environment that allows the oils to work at their best, with the help of trained professionals. However, this doesn’t mean that beginners can’t use essential oils at home; you can - the art is just in selecting the most appropriate oils and using them safely to create the desired effects.

Hey Karen, There’s so much information on essential oils and much of it comes from MLM companies looking to sell lots of oils (much like Avon). These companies work on a commission basis and encourage reps to push information that’s not always safe or studied. I think much of the information on ingesting oils comes from these companies and sellers. I wouldn’t advise ingesting oils unless under the care of a natural doctor that knows what they are doing. One of the best sources for all-things essential oil safety is this independent site run by a certified aromatherapist: http://www.learningabouteos.com/. Plant Therapy also provides great information on their blog. Hope that helps :).
Essential oils extracted from plants (literally taking the “essence” of the scent and flavor of the plant or herb) have been used for medicinal and wellness purposes for centuries. Sometimes the benefits come from rubbing the oils into the skin but they can also be added to warm baths or misters to inhale for aromatherapy benefits. Depending on the oil, they can be used to ease headaches or muscle pain, help with emotional issues like anxiety and stress. Some oils (such as peppermint, lavender, and lemon) have more than one purpose and can be blended, so we checked out kits that cover the basics. When choosing, make sure these collections include any personal favorites. We also looked for oils that are naturally derived rather than having gone through a chemical process. This ensures they are purer and less diluted, with authentic aromas to create a pleasing scent to ease your aches and pains — or, just to make bath time into a spa ritual.  
Essential oils extracted from plants (literally taking the “essence” of the scent and flavor of the plant or herb) have been used for medicinal and wellness purposes for centuries. Sometimes the benefits come from rubbing the oils into the skin but they can also be added to warm baths or misters to inhale for aromatherapy benefits. Depending on the oil, they can be used to ease headaches or muscle pain, help with emotional issues like anxiety and stress. Some oils (such as peppermint, lavender, and lemon) have more than one purpose and can be blended, so we checked out kits that cover the basics. When choosing, make sure these collections include any personal favorites. We also looked for oils that are naturally derived rather than having gone through a chemical process. This ensures they are purer and less diluted, with authentic aromas to create a pleasing scent to ease your aches and pains — or, just to make bath time into a spa ritual.  
Hey Karen, There’s so much information on essential oils and much of it comes from MLM companies looking to sell lots of oils (much like Avon). These companies work on a commission basis and encourage reps to push information that’s not always safe or studied. I think much of the information on ingesting oils comes from these companies and sellers. I wouldn’t advise ingesting oils unless under the care of a natural doctor that knows what they are doing. One of the best sources for all-things essential oil safety is this independent site run by a certified aromatherapist: http://www.learningabouteos.com/. Plant Therapy also provides great information on their blog. Hope that helps :).
Aromatherapy is a pseudoscience based on the usage of aromatic materials, including essential oils, and other aroma compounds, with claims for improving psychological or physical well-being.[1] It is offered as a complementary therapy or as a form of alternative medicine, the first meaning alongside standard treatments,[2] the second instead of conventional, evidence-based treatments.[3]
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