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The information provided on this Web site, through its social media networks and in supporting materials and communications is intended for basic, general informational purposes only. It is not intended as medical advice and it does not include all possible precautions, side effects, or interactions that may occur. Neither AromaWeb, LLC nor its founder take responsibility for how you use the information provided. Statements contained on AromaWeb have not been evaluated by the FDA. You should conduct thorough research via multiple sources and consult directly with a qualified doctor before using any essential oil or product. Information on AromaWeb must not be relied upon for medical, legal, financial or other decisions.
Oils with standardized content of components (marked FCC, for Food Chemicals Codex) are required[by whom?] to contain a specified amount of certain aroma chemicals that normally occur in the oil.[citation needed] There is no law that the chemicals cannot be added in synthetic form to meet the criteria established by the FCC for that oil.[citation needed] For instance, "lemongrass essential oil must contain 75% aldehyde to meet the FCC profile for that oil, but that aldehyde can come from a chemical refinery instead of from lemongrass." [14] To say that FCC oils are "food grade" makes them seem natural when they are not necessarily so.

A pilot study published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice found that the use of aromatherapy as a complementary therapy helped to reduce anxiety and depression scales in postpartum women. Women between zero and 18 months postpartum were divided into either a treatment group that inhaled a blend of rose and lavender oils or a control group that didn’t receive any type of aromatherapy. After four weeks, the women using aromatherapy had significant improvements in anxiety and depression symptoms compared to those in the control group. (12)
Especially if skin sensitivity is a concern, definitely ALWAYS dilute your essential oil with a common neutral carrier oil (also called base oils) before application. Carrier oils are typically cold-pressed oils and do not evaporate like essential oils do, but they can go rancid where essential oils will not. Your choice of carrier oil will depend a bit on preference of smell, texture, and sensitivities to avoid allergic reactions. Popular choices for carrier oils are coconut oil, sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, avocado oil, sunflower oil or grape seed oil.
Attempt to keep your breath relaxed as you inhale. Notice if it gets caught in the body or if it flows in and out with ease. A deep breath isn’t a sniff. If you practice slow, deep breaths, your body will send signals to your mind that it needs to relax – and your entire body will follow. Your body and mind aren’t separate things, and sometimes tricking the body to relax first, is going go put the mind in a position to achieve relaxation as well.
You can use essential oils in any number of ways. For example, add them to body lotions or carrier oils, and then apply them topically. Try enhancing a facial toner, shampoo, or conditioner with essential oils. Or incorporate them into liquid soap, toothpaste, or mouthwash. You can also diffuse or spritz the oils throughout a room or pour them into a bath.
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